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Research Papers for 2015:

  • Prescription Tablets in the Digital Age: A Cross-Sectional Study Exploring Patient and Physician Attitudes Toward the Use of Tablets for Clinic-Based Personalized Health Care Information Exchange

    Patel V, Hale TM, Palakodeti S, Kvedar JC, Jethwani K.

  • Editorial: Making Mobile Health Measure Up

    Kourosh AS, Kvedar JC.

    Introduction: Nearly 50 years ago, Kligman challenged our field to produce devices and methodologies that would allow dermatologists to care for patients without need of the human eye. Now, as new smartphone applications (apps) spring up daily and new modalities for remote monitoring offer alternatives for managing aspects of the traditional physician-patient visit, our field has entered a technological exploration phase, fashioning and testing health innovations as predicted by a dermatologic Jules Verne decades ago. This new phase brings with it new research considerations and new questions. A technological intervention study, for example, must face 2 particular questions: how to deliver effective health care within the new media now possible for patient interactions and how to measure that health care delivery effectively. Read More

  • Heart Failure Remote Monitoring: Evidence From the Retrospective Evaluation of a Real-World Remote Monitoring Program

    Agboola S, Jethwani K, Khateeb K, Moore S, Kvedar J.

    BACKGROUND: Given the magnitude of increasing heart failure mortality, multidisciplinary approaches, in the form of disease management programs and other integrative models of care, are recommended to optimize treatment outcomes. Remote monitoring, either as structured telephone support or telemonitoring or a combination of both, is fast becoming an integral part of many disease management programs. However, studies reporting on the evaluation of real-world heart failure remote monitoring programs are scarce.

  • Patient Engagement With a Mobile Web-Based Telemonitoring System for Heart Failure Self-Management: A Pilot Study

    Zan S, Agboola S, Moore SA, Parks KA, Kvedar JC, Jethwani K

    Background: Intensive remote monitoring programs for congestive heart failure have been successful in reducing costly readmissions, but may not be appropriate for all patients. There is an opportunity to leverage the increasing accessibility of mobile technologies and consumer-facing digital devices to empower patients in monitoring their own health outside of the hospital setting. The iGetBetter system, a secure Web- and telephone-based heart failure remote monitoring program, which leverages mobile technology and portable digital devices, offers a creative solution at lower cost.

  • The Effect of Technology-Based Interventions on Pain, Depression, and Quality of Life in Patients With Cancer: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Agboola SO, Ju W, Elfiky A, Kvedar JC, Jethwani K.

    BACKGROUND: The burden of cancer is increasing; projections over the next 2 decades suggest that the annual cases of cancer will rise from 14 million in 2012 to 22 million. However, cancer patients in the 21st century are living longer due to the availability of novel therapeutic regimens, which has prompted a growing focus on maintaining patients' health-related quality of life. Telehealth is increasingly being used to connect with patients outside of traditional clinical settings, and early work has shown its importance in improving quality of life and other clinical outcomes in cancer care.

  • Teledermatology: From historical perspective to emerging techniques of the modern era: Part II: Emerging technologies in teledermatology, limitations and future directions

    Coates SJ, Kvedar J, Granstein RD

    Abstract: Telemedicine is the use of telecommunications technology to support health care at a distance. Dermatology relies on visual cues that are easily captured by imaging technologies, making it ideally suited for this care model. Advances in telecommunications technology have made it possible to deliver high-quality skin care when patient and provider are separated by both time and space. Most recently, mobile devices that connect users through cellular data networks have enabled teledermatologists to instantly communicate with primary care providers throughout the world. The availability of teledermoscopy provides an additional layer of visual information to enhance the quality of teleconsultations. Teledermatopathology has become increasingly feasible because of advances in digitization of entire microscopic slides and robot-assisted microscopy. Barriers to additional expansion of these services include underdeveloped infrastructure in remote regions, fragmented electronic medical records, and varying degrees of reimbursement. Teleconsultants also confront special legal and ethical challenges as they work toward building a global network of practicing physicians.

  • Teledermatology: From historical perspective to emerging techniques of the modern era: Part I: History, rationale, and current practice

    Coates SJ, Kvedar J, Granstein RD

    Abstract: Telemedicine is the use of telecommunications technology to support health care at a distance. Technological advances have progressively increased the ability of clinicians to care for diverse patient populations in need of skin expertise. Dermatology relies on visual cues that are easily captured by imaging technologies, making it ideally suited for this care model. Moreover, there is a shortage of medical dermatologists in the United States, where skin disorders account for 1 in 8 primary care visits and specialists tend to congregate in urban areas. Even in regions where dermatologic expertise is readily accessible, teledermatology may serve as an alternative that streamlines health care delivery by triaging chief complaints and reducing unnecessary in-person visits. In addition, many patients in the developing world have no access to dermatologic expertise, rendering it possible for teledermatologists to make a significant contribution to patient health outcomes. Teledermatology also affords educational benefits to primary care providers and dermatologists, and enables patients to play a more active role in the health care process by promoting direct communication with dermatologists.

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